ID-Corner OpenID OpenID: Forget all of Those Passwords

OpenID: Forget all of Those Passwords

Sometimes it can be annoying to have to remember several different passwords to the numerous websites that you visit frequently. Due to this reason, that is why OpenID exists.

Sometimes it can be annoying to have to remember several different passwords to the numerous websites that you visit frequently. Due to this reason, that is why OpenID exists

What is OpenID?

OpenID gives users the ability to access multiple websites with only one password. Users have the option to calibrate information with their OpenID that they will allow communicating with certain websites. Thus, eliminating the need to use a different password each time you log in to a different website.

This doesn’t mean that those websites you frequent are no longer password protected. OpenID simply allows the website to confirm your identity to the website that is being accessed. It’s sort of like the fingerprint scanner on your iPhone that allows you to unlock it without using your passcode.

In order to log in with an OpenID, the user must obtain an OpenID identity. Identities are granted through OpenID providers, which are in abundance. Once you receive an OpenID identity, it will be in a URL format, which looks like this username.example.com, or like this: example.com/username.

How do you use it?

Once the user has created an OpenID identity with their provider of choice, they will be prompted to sign into the provider’s web page with their OpenID. At which point, the user has the freedom to grant their most frequently visited websites access to their OpenID in order to confirm their sign on identity. Thus, removing the need to input their password each time they log into their favorite websites.

Where did OpenID come from?

OpenID came about around the middle of 2005. It was developed by an open source community whose sole goal was to correct a problem that was unable to be easily rectified by the pre-existing forms of identity technologies. Since it was created within an open source, OpenID is not owned by any particular person, organization, or company.

Practically anyone has the ability to either be a user of an OpenID or become an OpenID provider. The best part about this is that it’s absolutely free to do so, and the user will not be subjected to pending approval by any organization or company.

OpenID may not be for everyone, but it is an option that is available to heavily active internet users who access multiple websites each day. There is also a representative for OpenID known as the OpenID Foundation. This foundation offers a legal presence for the open source model while also providing the community with infrastructure and promotional aids to further expand the adoption of OpenID.